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Production Team Culture Part 2

In the last post, I introduced the mantra for our production team: “Everything we do is profoundly spiritual”. This one statement has gone a long way for our team. It’s been our rallying cry. But most importantly, it has formed the foundation of our team culture.

At the beginning of every one of our training sessions, we take time to address this foundation of our team culture. Even though all of our camera team is there for a camera team training on how to operate cameras at another level, we always take the first 10-15 minutes to talk about the foundation of our team culture. Some members of our team have heard this exact talk a few times already, but we still go over it. It’s that important that we talk about it every time we gather to improve our team.  It’s worth noting as our team grows there’s always someone that needs to hear the foundation of the team culture, but even if there wasn’t any new people, we’d still go over this foundation.

Remember that our last post talked about the base foundation: “Everything we do is profoundly spritual.”  From that, our team operates from three simple ideas.


One of the biggest hesitations that people have in joining a production team, especially in larger churches is that they are scared to mess up. We have a good mixture of people on our team with previous experience and no previous experience. What’s interesting to find out is that even the experienced one have hesitations in serving because of a fear of messing up. So we bring this up front – Since everything we do is profoundly spiritual, we will always show grace for making mistakes.  And we make it very clear, that we will have grace for mistakes.  I’ve personally been in production long enough to make every mistake there is to make. Any time humans are involved there will be mistakes.

There is another side to the statement of how we react to other team members making mistakes. As a team member, we extend the same grace to them when they mess up that we would want for ourselves when we mess up.  This covers how we talk to each other on headset, how we recover from mistakes, and the conversations had after service in our down time.


However, since everything we do is profoundly spiritual, we are not comfortable with mistakes. Beyond our team, which is what point one primarily deals with, we realize that everything we do has a profound spiritual impact for those walking in the room or watching online. Because of that, we are not comfortable with mistakes.  Just because our team shows grace, doesn’t mean at the end of the day that we are ok with the mistake happening. Spiritual impact of our services doesn’t last for a day, it lasts for eternity. Naturally, we take what we do very seriously, we approach it with seriousness, professionalism, and excellence in mind.


The final practical step we focus on is the idea of constantly getting better, constantly training, constantly looking for new areas of improvement. Since everything we do is profoundly spiritual, we will always push to be better. Sometimes the best team statements are the obvious ones.  But putting it into words gives it validity.  It gives the idea a tangible way for the team to remember what’s important for our team culture. For us, our church is growing at a fast rate, and it’s important to keep this idea of constantly being on the lookout for ways to make things better – both personally and team wide. We push to be better not so that we have the best production team, not so that we have the best church, but because of spiritual impact.  We push to get better because lives hang in the balance, because families hang in the balance, and because eternity hangs in the balance.

You might say to yourself, that seems a bit deep for a production team to focus on when people only really notice if the projectors work or if the lyrics are in time. But when you start laying a foundation for your production team that has motivation and vision beyond tech equipment, great things start to happen and your team starts to grow!

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Production Team Culture

It would be an easy argument to make that the most overlooked part of any production team is good culture. With all the scheduling, countdowns, deadlines, euipment fixing, training, recruiting, demands for excellence, and typically undermanned staff teams, it’s really easy to focus on all the practical aspects of maintaining a great production team.  Let’s face it, at the end of the day, the whole church notices if a projector doesn’t work, but not very many people notice if the culture of a production team isn’t great – at least not right away they won’t.

Perfect production team culture is not something that we have fully figured out – no one has. However, our team culture is something that is a big focus for us, and has been for quite some time. However, I will admit, it wasn’t always a big focus for us. Naturally, as a tech guy, you think as long as we have the best equipment, and we are great at what we do, then our production team culture will be perfect! When in fact, great production team culture must be emphasized (with words: written and spoken) and practiced before it starts to take hold.

Tech people naturally geek out at new equipment. One major component to tech people joining the production team in the first place is getting to serve via the use of technology. Technology speaks to some people in a way that music speaks to musicians, and colors speak to artists. However, the practical side of any discipline will only speak to a person for so long before the need for motivation arises.

Let’s look at it this way, it will take an average person an hour or two to figure out how to run propresenter, but what’s next? Does a volunteer just keep clicking the same slides week in and week out? The short answer – Yes. But what keeps great volunteers coming back is the understanding that what they are doing has a greater impact than just firing slides. Our team sums it up this way:


One of our worship leaders mentioned this statement in one of our prayer times, and it has stuck to our team ever since. Everything we do is profoundly spiritual. Every slide we click, every cable we tape down, every bulb we replace, every (fill in the blank here), has a profound spiritual impact. Now that’s a great motivator. It’s become the mantra of our team. It’s something that we start every training with. It’s something we bring up in conversation.  It’s even something we say jokingly when we are doing hard tasks like pulling cable across an entire campus, in the ceiling, with no air conditioning, in the middle of summer, in Texas. But even in those joking moments, it’s a constant reminder of why we do what we do.

That’s the foundation of our team culture. That’s square one. In the next post, I’ll continue the thought of foundations by addressing three ways that statement practically impacts our team.